Friday, March 6 - FORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA

Like many southeast Florida neighbors, Fort Lauderdale has long been revitalizing. In a state where gaudy tourist zones often stand aloof from workaday downtown, Fort Lauderdale exhibits consistency at both ends of the 2-mile Las Olas corridor. The sparkling look results from upgrades both downtown and on the beachfront. Matching the downtown's innovative arts district, cafes, and boutiques is an equally inventive beach area, with hotels, cafes, and shops facing an undeveloped shoreline, and new resort-style hotels replacing faded icons of yesteryear. Despite wariness of pretentious over development, city leaders have allowed a striking number of glittering high-rises. Nostalgic locals and frequent visitors fret over the diminishing vision of sailboats bobbing in waters near downtown; however, Fort Lauderdale remains the yachting capital of the world, and water toys don't seem to be going anywhere.

Saturday, March 7 - AT SEA

Sunday, March 8 - AT SEA

Monday, March 9 - SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO

If you associate Puerto Rico's capital with the colonial streets of Old San Juan, then you know only part of the picture. San Juan is a major metropolis, radiating out from the bay on the Atlantic Ocean that was discovered by Juan Ponce de Leon. More than a third of the island's nearly 4 million citizens proudly call themselves sanjuaneros. The city may be rooted in the past, but it has its eye on the future. Locals go about their business surrounded by colonial architecture and towering modern structures. By 1508 the explorer Juan Ponce de Leon had established a colony in an area now known as Caparra, southeast of present-day San Juan. He later moved the settlement north to a more hospitable peninsular location.

Tuesday, March 10 - GUSTAVIA (ST. BARTHELEMY), GUADELOUPE

Gustavia is a good place to shop. Some of the shops close from noon to 3 or 4, so plan accordingly, but stores stay open past 7 in the evening. Many of the stores and boutiques are found on Quai de la Republique, Rue de France or on other streets close to the harbor. Cafes and bars along the streets make for good resting spots during your stroll.

Wednesday, March 11 - ST. JOHN'S, ANTIGUA AND BARBUDA

Antigua's capital, with some 45,000 inhabitants (approximately half the island's population), lies at sea level at the inland end of a sheltered northwestern bay. Although it has seen better days, a couple of notable historic sights and some good waterfront shopping areas make it worth a visit. At the far south end of town, where Market Street forks into Valley and All Saints roads, haggling goes on every Friday and Saturday, when locals jam the Public Market to buy and sell fruits, vegetables, fish, and spices. Ask before you aim a camera; your subject may expect a tip. This is old-time Caribbean shopping, a jambalaya of sights, sounds, and smells.

Thursday, March 12 - LITTLE BAY (MONSERRAT), MONTSERRAT

Nicknamed the "Pompeii of the Caribbean" due to the strong volcanic activities of the Island throughout the nineties, Montserrat still bears in some of its lands the layers of ash. However, you would be wrong to overlook the island. Indeed, Little Bay, deemed as the island's new capital, encloses many hidden creeks and beautiful, off-the-beaten-path beaches which are definitely worth a detour. Sit back and relish the surroundings in an area that will soon be in the spotlight of Caribbean ecotourism.

Friday, March 13 - JOST VAN DYKE, BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS

Jost Van Dyke, four miles long, is truly known as the 'barefoot island'. The smallest of the British Virgin islands, it is known as a popular destination for yachts and is celebrated for its casual lifestyle, protected anchorages, fine beaches and beachfront restaurants and bars. The island has fewer than 200 inhabitants and they are widely known as a welcoming people. The island's name conjures up its rich, colorful past,. Jost Van Dyke is said to have been named for an early Dutch settler, a former pirate. At Great Harbour, Little Harbour, and White Bay there are safe, protected bays and pristine beaches shaded with coconut palms and seagrape trees. Discover inviting shops selling local treasures, restaurants, and bars. 'The Painkill', one of the Caribbean's most popular dinks, originated at the Soggy Dollar Bar.

Saturday, March 14 - AT SEA

Sunday, March 15 - AT SEA

Monday, March 16 - FORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA

Like many southeast Florida neighbors, Fort Lauderdale has long been revitalizing. In a state where gaudy tourist zones often stand aloof from workaday downtowns, Fort Lauderdale exhibits consistency at both ends of the 2-mile Las Olas corridor. The sparkling look results from upgrades both downtown and on the beachfront. Matching the downtown's innovative arts district, cafes, and boutiques is an equally inventive beach area, with hotels, cafes, and shops facing an undeveloped shoreline, and new resort-style hotels replacing faded icons of yesteryear. Despite wariness of pretentious overdevelopment, city leaders have allowed a striking number of glittering high-rises.  Nostalgic locals and frequent visitors fret over the diminishing vision of sailboats bobbing in waters near downtown; however, Fort Lauderdale remains the yachting capital of the world, and the water toys don't seem to be going anywhere.