Saturday, April 3 - PHILIPSBURG, SINT MAARTEN

Since 2010, Sint Maarten has been a constituent country within the kingdom of The Netherlands. It comprises the "Dutch side" of the island of Saint-Martin, the other half being a French overseas territory. Philipsburg is its capital and a busy deep-water port city. It is a popular port for cruise ships, and consequently boasts a thriving duty-free shopping community, a range of resorts and villas, and numerous leisure and sightseeing activities, as well as a well-served airport.

Sunday, April 4 - SOPERS HOLE (FRENCHMANS CAY), BVI

This bug harbor at the West End of Tortola is the classic Caribbean yacht haven, tucked between the high ground of West End on one side and Frenchman's Cay on the other. It was a notorious den for pirates in the past, who used the high ground to watch for naval ships or potential victims. The marinas and resorts were hard hit by hurricanes Irma and Maria in August and September 2017. But most services have been restored and the community is eager to welcome visitors again. Check on the progress at Pusser's Landing, the multi-service home of the famous wood-distilled rum and the Painkiller cocktail, which is good even if you're not in pain. There are numerous restaurants, cafes, and bars providing hospitable rest stops for people-watching and yarn-spinning.

Monday, April 5 - GUSTAVIA, SAINT BARTHELEMY

Tiny St. Barts, as it is commonly called, lies 125 miles northwest of the French island of Guadeloupe, of which it is a dependency. Its geographic features include steep, green, once-active volcano hills, deep valleys, and beautiful beaches. Founded by the French, ceded to Sweden then returned to France, the toy-scaled capital of Gustavia is built around the harbor on the island's southwest coats. Many of the island's inhabitants are descendants of settlers from Brittany, Normandy, and Sweden. Today they operate small wins, cafes, restaurants, and boutiques that are housed in old buildings of Swedish colonial and French Creole architecture. Too small for most cruise ships, Gustavia's harbor is a favorite layover for sailing yachts, and with prices well beyond the means of the masses, visits are mostly limited to a few hours of day-trippers from nearby St. Martin/St. Maarten. The majority of visitors staying on the island still come from among the privileged who treasure the laid-back atmosphere and small-gem perfection of St. Barts.

Tuesday, April 6 - BASSETERRE, ST. KITTS AND NEVIS

"The Beautiful Sisters," St. Kitts and Nevis are separated by a two-mile-wide strait but joined together as an independent island nation. Known and loved for their sleepy pace, these islands are awakening to become an "in" place among well-traveled North Americans and Europeans. A small, green volcanic speck in the blue Caribbean, St. Kitts offers quiet beaches, remnants of the old British plantocracy, and dreamy days under silk-cotton trees, soothed by the scents of flamboyant and frangipani. The native Arawak and Carib Indians called St. Kitts the fertile isle, and until as recently as 2007, the island was still dependent upon sugar for a large segment of its economy.

Wednesday, April 7 - TERRE-DE-HAUT, ILES DES SAINTES, GUADELOUPE

The Iles des Saintes, a tiny cluster of islets off the southern coast of Guadeloupe if what the doctor ordered., if he ordered an unspoiled Caribbean experience  No franchise duty free, no big hotels, no casinos. It is what much of the Caribbean used to be like. Stroll around the little town of Bourg de Saintes. Shop for real French cosmetics from the sidewalk vendors. Grab a seat and a beer and revel in the weather and the pace of the past.

Thursday, April 8 - CASTRIES, SAINT LUCIA

St. Lucia is the sort of island that travelers to the Caribbean dream about--a small, lush tropical gem that is still relatively unknown. The Atlantic Ocean kisses its eastern shore, while the beaches of the west coast owe their beauty to the calm Caribbean Sea. St. Lucia seems like an island plucked from the South Pacific and set down in the Caribbean. Its dramatic twin coastal peaks, the Pitons, soar 2,500 feet up from the sea, sheltering magnificent rain forests where wild orchids, giant ferns, and birds of paradise flourish. Brilliantly-plumed tropical birds abound, including endangered species like the indigenous St. Lucia parrot.

Friday, April 9 - SALINE BAY, MAYREAU, ST. VINCENT AND THE GRENADINES

At this idyllic islet in the Tobago Cays, we sometimes anchor and indulge in a water sports Marina Day.

Saturday, April 10 - BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS

Bridgetown, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, is an elegant capital city proudly displaying its 400 years of British heritage. Although, originally settled by Amerindian peoples 1,500 years ago, in the 17th century Barbados became one of the largest and most successful sugarcane producing areas in the world. At one point in time, the income from sugar outweighed that of all the other British colonies combined. A stroll through town will guide you through Bridgetown's history, to the statue of Admiral Horatio Nelson, past the Parliament Buildings. St. Michaels Cathedral, St. Mary's church, Jubilee Gardens, and eventually over Chamberlain Bridge. A picturesque seaside boardwalk will lead you to one of the many exceptional shorelines cafes and restaurants. One thousand-year-old Baobab trees in Queen's park, the largest in the Caribbean, stand as silent witnesses to past life here. Lounge on a serene beach, explore a plantation, discover sea turtles and even sample one of the islands renowned rhyme distilleries.